Useful Packaging & Labeling Industry Terminology

The world of packaging & labeling is quite complicated and can be littered with complex terms and legalese. The origins of the USA’s current regulatory framework can be traced back to the Uniform Packaging and Labeling Regulation (UPLR) that was first adopted in 1952. The UPLR requires that consumer packaging bear a label specifying the following:

  • the identity of the commodity
  • the name and place of business of the manufacturer, packer, or distributor
  • the net quantity of contents in terms of weight, mass measure, or numerical count is in a uniform location upon the principal display panel

UPLR has precise definitions for seemingly simple and straightforward terms like “package” or “label.” Select terms you may find useful are defined and explained below. For a complete list of terms along with their definitions and exceptions, please refer to the relevant section in  NIST Handbook 130

Package

The term “package,” whether standard package or random package, means any commodity: (a) enclosed in a container or wrapped in any manner in advance of wholesale or retail sale, or (b) whose weight or measure has been determined in the wholesale or retail sale. An individual item or lot of any commodity on which a selling price is marked based on an established price per unit of weight or measure shall be considered a package or packages.

Consumer Package or Consumer Commodity

A package that is:

  • customarily produced or distributed for sale through retail sales agencies or for consumption
  • used by individuals for the purposes of personal care
  • used in the performance of services ordinarily rendered in or about the household
  • used in connection with personal possessions

Random Package

A package that is a lot, shipment, or delivery of packages of the same consumer commodity with no fixed pattern of net contents.

Label

Any written, printed, or graphic matter affixed to, applied to, attached to, blown into, formed, molded into, embossed on, or appearing upon or adjacent to a consumer commodity, or a package containing any consumer commodity, for purposes of branding, identifying, or giving any information concerning the product or the contents of the package.

Principal Display Panel(s)

The part(s) of a label that is designed to most likely be displayed, presented, shown, or examined under the usual and customary display and purchase conditions. Wherever a principal display panel appears more than once on a package, all requirements about the “principal display panel” shall pertain to all such “principal display panels.”

Multi-Unit Package

A package containing two or more individual packages of the same commodity, in the same quantity, is intended to be sold as a multi-unit package, but where the component packages are labeled individually in full compliance with all requirements of this regulation.

Combination Package

A package intended for retail sale, containing two or more individual packages or units of different commodities. Examples: antiquing or housecleaning kit sponge and cleaner lighter fluid and flints. 

Variety Package

A package intended for retail sale, containing two or more individual packages or units of similar, but not identical, commodities. Commodities that are generically the same, but that differ in weight, measure, volume, appearance, or quality, are considered similar, but not identical. Examples: two sponges of different sizes or plastic tableware, consisting of four spoons, four knives, and four forks.

Spot Label

A spot label is a label clearly defined utilizing a border, indentation, or other means that cover only a small portion of the surface of a principal display panel of a package; the entire portion of the principal display panel outside the area of the label contains no printed or graphic matter of any kind. A spot label may provide all required labeling information (identity, responsibility, and net contents), but it must at least indicate the identity and net contents.

Header Strip

A header label or header strip is a label that is attached across the top of a transparent or opaque bag or other containers that bears no other printed or graphic material.

Standard Package

A package that is one of a lot, shipment, or delivery of parcels of the same commodity with identical net content declarations. Examples: 1 L bottles or 12 fl. oz cans of carbonated soda, or 500 g or 5 lb. bags of sugar. 

Have Questions or Looking to Print Labels In-House?

If you’re interested in learning more about how you can print product labels on-demand, feel free to contact us to schedule a free demonstration or speak with one of our specialists!  

How to Read & Label Chemical Cleaning Supplies

Not all JanSan labels are easy to get approved. If you handle sanitation or chemical supplies, you know there are specific marks and content that must appear on the product labels.

In this post, you will gain insight into chemical and GHS label markings and how to label them. In addition, we will cover how utilizing an on-demand color label printer can provide the best labeling solution for your products.

What Are GHS and Chemical Regulations?

Janitorial and sanitation products are among the chemicals that require color-coded chemical hazard identification labels in compliance with GHS Labeling regulations.

GHS stands for Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, which are usually represented as red and black pictograms.

Also known as graphic symbols, pictograms are used to communicate specific information about the hazards of a chemical. The GHS regulation standards use a total of nine pictograms.

The purpose of these symbols is to provide workers with better information on the safe handling and use of hazardous chemicals, thereby allowing them (or anyone handling the product) to avoid injuries and illnesses related to exposures to hazardous chemicals.

To read more on each GHS classification symbol, with a more in-depth review of each, please view our white paper GHS Chemical Labeling Compliance: Requirements & Solutions.

What to Include on Chemical Cleaning Supply Labels

The Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) states, “chemical manufacturers, importers, or distributors must ensure that each container of hazardous chemicals is labeled, tagged or marked with the following information: product identifier; signal word; hazard statement(s); precautionary 1 2 statement(s); and pictogram(s); and name, address and telephone number of the chemical manufacturer, importer, or other responsible parties.”

Make Compliance Easier by Printing Compliant Labels In-House 

Now that you have a better understanding of the labeling requirements, what’s the best way to create your labels?

If you are in the industry, you already know most GHS label printers offer the ability to print GHS compliant labels in just two colors, red and black.

An ideal durable label printer, QuickLabel tabletop label printer has the ability to instantly print full-color GHS JanSan labels in 1200 dpi resolution.

The QuickLabel “D” printers produce durable, pigment based labels that are able to withstand water, dirt, exposure, abrasion, and hazardous chemicals while maintaining color-fastness.

So, with a QL-120D, you can print your entire chemical label in seconds, including your logo and primary display panel graphics and the red and black GHS pictograms, text, barcode, and serializations.

See What the Extra-Durable, GHS Compliant Kiaro! D is Capable of:

Printing in full color, 1200 dpi allows your compliant GHS labels to send two messages:

1. A responsible manufacturer has packaged the product safely.

2. The company logo and branding stand out from other competitors.

A QuickLabel printer provides valuable competitive advantages by maintaining GHS compliance and showing off signature brands.

Stand Out on the Shelves

While other companies are stuck with identical packaging, you have the option to stand out with custom messaging. Your custom label and verbiage will ensure customers and clients know exactly who manufactures their chemicals.

To get the perfect package, we recommend using labeling software in addition to an in-house label printer. Labeling software allows you to link your database of chemical descriptions with a label printer for accuracy.

With a robust color label printer such as the QL-120D and a fully-featured GHS labeling software such as NiceLabel, it is easy to become compliant and maintain compliance.

Interested in learning more about in-house durable label printers?

Contact us for more information on GHS and chemical JanSan labels.

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