Useful Packaging & Labeling Industry Terminology

The world of packaging & labeling is quite complicated and can be littered with complex terms and legalese. The origins of the USA’s current regulatory framework can be traced back to the Uniform Packaging and Labeling Regulation (UPLR) that was first adopted in 1952. The UPLR requires that consumer packaging bear a label specifying the following:

  • the identity of the commodity
  • the name and place of business of the manufacturer, packer, or distributor
  • the net quantity of contents in terms of weight, mass measure, or numerical count is in a uniform location upon the principal display panel

UPLR has precise definitions for seemingly simple and straightforward terms like “package” or “label.” Select terms you may find useful are defined and explained below. For a complete list of terms along with their definitions and exceptions, please refer to the relevant section in  NIST Handbook 130

Package

The term “package,” whether standard package or random package, means any commodity: (a) enclosed in a container or wrapped in any manner in advance of wholesale or retail sale, or (b) whose weight or measure has been determined in the wholesale or retail sale. An individual item or lot of any commodity on which a selling price is marked based on an established price per unit of weight or measure shall be considered a package or packages.

Consumer Package or Consumer Commodity

A package that is:

  • customarily produced or distributed for sale through retail sales agencies or for consumption
  • used by individuals for the purposes of personal care
  • used in the performance of services ordinarily rendered in or about the household
  • used in connection with personal possessions

Random Package

A package that is a lot, shipment, or delivery of packages of the same consumer commodity with no fixed pattern of net contents.

Label

Any written, printed, or graphic matter affixed to, applied to, attached to, blown into, formed, molded into, embossed on, or appearing upon or adjacent to a consumer commodity, or a package containing any consumer commodity, for purposes of branding, identifying, or giving any information concerning the product or the contents of the package.

Principal Display Panel(s)

The part(s) of a label that is designed to most likely be displayed, presented, shown, or examined under the usual and customary display and purchase conditions. Wherever a principal display panel appears more than once on a package, all requirements about the “principal display panel” shall pertain to all such “principal display panels.”

Multi-Unit Package

A package containing two or more individual packages of the same commodity, in the same quantity, is intended to be sold as a multi-unit package, but where the component packages are labeled individually in full compliance with all requirements of this regulation.

Combination Package

A package intended for retail sale, containing two or more individual packages or units of different commodities. Examples: antiquing or housecleaning kit sponge and cleaner lighter fluid and flints. 

Variety Package

A package intended for retail sale, containing two or more individual packages or units of similar, but not identical, commodities. Commodities that are generically the same, but that differ in weight, measure, volume, appearance, or quality, are considered similar, but not identical. Examples: two sponges of different sizes or plastic tableware, consisting of four spoons, four knives, and four forks.

Spot Label

A spot label is a label clearly defined utilizing a border, indentation, or other means that cover only a small portion of the surface of a principal display panel of a package; the entire portion of the principal display panel outside the area of the label contains no printed or graphic matter of any kind. A spot label may provide all required labeling information (identity, responsibility, and net contents), but it must at least indicate the identity and net contents.

Header Strip

A header label or header strip is a label that is attached across the top of a transparent or opaque bag or other containers that bears no other printed or graphic material.

Standard Package

A package that is one of a lot, shipment, or delivery of parcels of the same commodity with identical net content declarations. Examples: 1 L bottles or 12 fl. oz cans of carbonated soda, or 500 g or 5 lb. bags of sugar. 

Have Questions or Looking to Print Labels In-House?

If you’re interested in learning more about how you can print product labels on-demand, feel free to contact us to schedule a free demonstration or speak with one of our specialists!  

Not Your Average Licorice, Not Your Average Label Printer

During a trip to Denmark,  AstroNova met with luxury licorice company Lakrids by Bülow to see how they use their QuickLabel QL-300 to print quality, high-end labels to complement their brand.  

Now a luxury licorice brand with global reach, Lakrids by Bülow got its start in 2007 when the first shop was opened in Svaneke, Denmark.  The shop was an instant hit with locals, and the product seemed to be so popular, keeping up the demand was a challenge.  But, just a year later, in 2008, they scaled production to meet the demand, opened their first factory, and installed a licorice machine. From there, the operation only grew bigger.  Especially once Lakrids did what was said couldn’t be done – coat the licorice with chocolate.

Over a decade later, with a vision to spread the love for licorice around the globe, Lakrids has built itself into a high-end, luxury brand with fans around the world. Making their products all on-site with raw materials, Lakrids prides itself on not being your average licorice. Now, with over 25 locations globally, operations have understandably expanded to meet demands, and Lakrids has added the QuickLabel QL-300 to its production line and uses it to print the labels on the tops of their product jars.

The Power of CMYK + WHITE

While QuickLabel was there, Lakrids expressed their appreciation and excitement about the quality of the white color, which influenced their decision to purchase the QL-300. With a desire to truly create something special, quality and branding are of utmost importance. 

So, when Lakrids was searching for a labeling solution, they were looking for a solution that would heighten their brand and, ultimately, add value to it. Lakrids wanted to print brilliantly beautiful labels to match the aesthetic of the brand, which is where QuickLabel came in. 

Tage Kusk, Technical Director at Lakrids by Bülow, said, “The QL-300 prints extra-wide like we needed to have the right background for our labels. The labels printed on the QL-300 look magnificent.”  

Kusk continued, “We get the labels on the same day, and we can change the design if we’re not satisfied since we have the flexibility to do so.” “Having the capability of printing with the white toner gave us a perfect look. The QL-300 can do so much more than you expect.”  

It’s All in the Packaging 

Lakrids by Büllow takes pride in not just selling a product but selling a design item.  They’ve found their customers enjoy the look of the product, and for this, Lakrids has become an icon.   

“The thing our customers should know about Lakrids by Büllow is that it’s quality, and we care about every little part; not just the core part that you eat, but also about the packaging and labeling.”, said Kusk. 

  “We make the world love licorice!

Looking to Print Labels In-House?

If you’re interested in learning more about how you can print dynamic, luxury labels on-demand, feel free to contact us to schedule a free demonstration or speak with one of our specialists!